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Quick Tech News

QuickTechnics

by A. Fäh

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Quick Tech News

QuickTechnics

by Alexander Fäh

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Revolution in 3D Printing: MIT Researchers Introduce Liquid Metal Technique


 
  • Liquid Metal for Large Components: MIT researchers introduce Liquid Metal Printing (LMP), a technique enabling 3D printing of large metal parts in record time.

  • Speed and Scale: LMP is at least ten times faster than comparable metal additive manufacturing processes but does not achieve high resolution.

  • Applications in Architecture and Design: The technique is suitable for applications in architecture, construction, and industrial design where high resolution is not crucial.

 

3D Printing with Liquid Metal: MIT Researchers Reach New Frontiers in Additive Manufacturing.

The MIT team develops a groundbreaking technique for 3D printing with liquid metal, revolutionizing the production of large parts in minutes.
The MIT team develops a groundbreaking technique for 3D printing with liquid metal, revolutionizing the production of large parts in minutes.

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed a revolutionary method for 3D printing with liquid metal. The technique, known as Liquid Metal Printing (LMP), enables the rapid production of large components such as table legs and chair frames in a matter of minutes.


The LMP technique involves depositing molten aluminum along a predefined path into a bed of tiny glass beads. The aluminum quickly solidifies into a 3D structure.

The researchers claim that LMP is at least ten times faster than comparable metal additive manufacturing processes, and the heating and melting procedure is more efficient than some other methods.


However, the technique sacrifices resolution for speed and scale. While it can produce components larger than those typically made with slower additive techniques and at a lower cost, it cannot achieve high resolutions.


In a recent study, the researchers demonstrated the procedure by printing aluminum frames and parts for tables and chairs that were strong enough to withstand post-print machining. They showed how components made with LMP could be combined with high-resolution processes and additional materials to create functional furniture.

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