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by A. Fäh

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Quick Tech News

QuickTechnics

by Alexander Fäh

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Revolutionary 3D-Printed Sweat Sensor for Health Monitoring Developed at the University of Hawai'i

 
  • The University of Hawai'i has developed a groundbreaking 3D-printed sweat sensor capable of real-time detection of a wide range of health conditions.

  • This sensor, created by Assistant Professor Tyler Ray, aims to revolutionize health monitoring through accessible technology and early diagnosis of serious conditions such as cystic fibrosis.

  • The university actively supports entrepreneurship and an innovation ecosystem through programs like "Patents2Products" and "Faculty Fellows," empowering students and faculty to translate their research into commercial technologies and establishing the university as a center for innovation and technology transfer.

 

Innovative 3D-Printed Sweat Sensor: Hawai'i Sets the Bar in Health Monitoring.

The 3D-printed sweat sensor from the University of Hawai'i is transforming health monitoring.
The 3D-printed sweat sensor from the University of Hawai'i is transforming health monitoring.

An outstanding healthcare innovation project has thrust the University of Hawai'i onto the global stage of 3D printing technology. A 3D-printed wearable sweat sensor capable of detecting a variety of health conditions in real time has recently been recognized as one of the most promising healthcare innovations of 2023 by IN-PART, a platform connecting industry with impact-driven academic technologies.


Developed by Assistant Professor Tyler Ray at UH Mānoa's College of Engineering, this groundbreaking device has secured an impressive fifth place ranking based on introduction requests, positive feedback, and article reads.


This innovative sensor collects and analyzes sweat to provide vital health insights or diagnose serious conditions such as cystic fibrosis. Utilizing 3D printing technology, it paves the way for accessible, convenient, and insightful personal health monitoring.


Professor Ray stated, "As our group strives to advance health equity through improved access to preventive technologies, it is gratifying to see our sweat sensor research recognized as a promising innovation. However, there is still much work ahead to fully realize the potential of our platform, as our ultimate goal is to pioneer digital health tools that detect conditions early and holistically preserve human health."


This innovative sweat sensor technology from UH Mānoa underscores the university's commitment to fostering entrepreneurship. Recently launched programs such as "Patents2Products" and "Faculty Fellows" from the UH Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation aim to nurture an innovation ecosystem at UH Mānoa.


These programs offer training to translate cutting-edge research into commercial technologies, enabling students and faculty to bring their ideas from the lab to the market. Recognition of inventions like the sweat sensor promotes the university as a hub for world-changing innovation and technology transfer.

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